dinsdag 15 december 2015

Homemaker's War Guide


Click on the image to view full-size.


Courtesy of this website (as I understand it's not copyrighted)

12 opmerkingen:

  1. You can go to the website you linked and look at the "extra large" size to be able to read it. You can even download it to your computer if you'd like. Thanks for this interesting link!

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  2. Sharon, you are welcome! To be able to read it on this blog, you'll have to click on it, then with the right mouse button choose "view image" and then it's possible to enlarge it, but, of course, you can also download it right from the site.

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  3. Very useful for everyone. How interesting did society use to promote thriftiness and a wise management of resources AND HOMEMAKING WAS SOMETHING HONOURABLE like you can notice in the front picture. The housewife in her home was valuable like any other worker or soldier in war. Nowadays, we are fed up with slogans in favor of spending money we don't have:"you deserve it, you must have this or that, the bank is you friend ready to help you with any problem".

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    Reacties
    1. Good words, Preoteasa. I whole-heartedly agree.

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  4. True that, and I like how it promotes thrift, however, the seeds of destruction were already sown as homemakers were persuaded to take part-time jobs. After WWII there was a short period when the progress of modernity was stalled for a while (1950s), then it all went downhill. I'm wondering sometimes whether all the women in war factories were really needed, couldn't they organise a temporary guest workers program? They don't mind flooding the country with immigrants now.

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  5. I really doubt that war was the true motivation for forcing women into the workforce. It is true this was a good oportunity for feminism to expand after WW II, but in my country things developped in favor of factories and breast-feeding mothers working in those factories. This many have been different in non-socialist countries. My mother's generation is the working class- women's generation whose children had two options: daycare for 3-month-babies or grannies/babysitter. My parents where wise enough to avoid daycare. My in-laws aswell. One had few options to escape that feminist society. Quitting your job in a totalitarian regime was daring and made you very vulnerable. Housing could be obtained in the factory flat that where distributed to the workers. Staying at home meant a chance less to rent a good flat. Owning one was a rare dream. This is what I was told by older people. Feminism was very strong in socialist countries. Homemakers where rare if they had been studying seriously because after graduating, the school used to organize selections for factories. You had to explain why you don't want any job after graduating. Not having a job was a crime against the working class.

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  6. Sorry for autocorrect mistakes. Were instead of where,may instead of many. I have to correct these automatic changes made by the keyboard.

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  7. Alexandra, never mind the mistakes! I don't think WWII was the motivation, I think it was an excuse, because the labour shortage could have easily being solved by the guest worker program, at least, in the USA.

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  8. I must add that when Germans occupied the Netherlands, they took the men and forced them to work in the factories, but it didn't cross their mind to draft women, especially mothers, for these purposes...

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  9. Housewife from Finland17 december 2015 om 03:48

    Sanne: I recall that Nazi's were actually very home-orientated. I mean they wanted women to stay home and bare new little nazis...

    But interesting guide. To me, it tells how poor we finns were during the war. There were no eggs weekly, or meat daily, and dairy products were also very stricktly put on rations. I recall it was even worse in Netherlands, since you were occupied?

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  10. Yes, a lot of folks were basically starving...Americans were lucky compared to the rest of the West! I know someone whose grandfather was taken to Germany to work and his wife stayed home with 2 small kids, yet she didn't work and her single sister took care of them, because she was a Mother. And yet nowadays we are so wealthy but can't seem to afford to have homemakers, isn't it funny?

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  11. As for Nazis, they still did have women in the Army though. It all got mixed up during WWI I think, when women went to drive ambulances for the Red Cross and stuff like that.

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